school-spo:
Receive the assignment: Read the instructions, look over the rubric, ask your teacher about any questions you might have
Make a plan: Map out your project. Set deadlines and little goals to get things done without all the stress
Budget your time wisely: When is the project due? Do you have other obligations that may make it difficult for you to finish your project on a set date?
Do your research! Make sure you know what you’re talking about! 
Create a research outline: Take organized, color coded notes! It’ll make it a lot easier to write the essay
Write a rough draft: Use all your good notes to write a rough draft
Have a peer edit: Ask a respected peer to edit your paper! Or, if possible, get your teacher to look it over and see any improvements it might need
Edit and create a final draft: Take their edits into consideration, and create your final draft
Hand it in! 

school-spo:

  1. Receive the assignment: Read the instructions, look over the rubric, ask your teacher about any questions you might have
  2. Make a plan: Map out your project. Set deadlines and little goals to get things done without all the stress
  3. Budget your time wisely: When is the project due? Do you have other obligations that may make it difficult for you to finish your project on a set date?
  4. Do your research! Make sure you know what you’re talking about! 
  5. Create a research outline: Take organized, color coded notes! It’ll make it a lot easier to write the essay
  6. Write a rough draft: Use all your good notes to write a rough draft
  7. Have a peer edit: Ask a respected peer to edit your paper! Or, if possible, get your teacher to look it over and see any improvements it might need
  8. Edit and create a final draft: Take their edits into consideration, and create your final draft
  9. Hand it in! 

(Source: collegeandchai)

1,649 notes


After nearly a decade together, Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie have finally tied the knot. The couple had been engaged since 2012. The marriage announcement came succinctly in a 140-character tweet from the AP: “Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt were married Saturday in France, says a spokesman for the couple.” The wedding was reportedly a private, nondenominational civil ceremony that took place at a small chapel in Correns, France’s Chateau Miraval, the AP reports. Hollywood’s most famous couple has been together since 2005 and are the parents of six children, each of whom took part in the wedding. (x)

After nearly a decade together, Brad Pitt and Angelina Jolie have finally tied the knot. The couple had been engaged since 2012. The marriage announcement came succinctly in a 140-character tweet from the AP: “Angelina Jolie and Brad Pitt were married Saturday in France, says a spokesman for the couple.” The wedding was reportedly a private, nondenominational civil ceremony that took place at a small chapel in Correns, France’s Chateau Miraval, the AP reports. Hollywood’s most famous couple has been together since 2005 and are the parents of six children, each of whom took part in the wedding. (x)

(Source: mrgolightly)

10,761 notes

futurejournalismproject:

Mapping Perspective
Via Al Jazeera:

Why do maps always show the north as up? For those who don’t just take it for granted, the common answer is that Europeans made the maps and they wanted to be on top. But there’s really no good reason for the north to claim top-notch cartographic real estate over any other bearing, as an examination of old maps from different places and periods can confirm…
…There is nothing inevitable or intrinsically correct — not in geographic, cartographic or even philosophical terms — about the north being represented as up, because up on a map is a human construction, not a natural one. Some of the very earliest Egyptian maps show the south as up, presumably equating the Nile’s northward flow with the force of gravity. And there was a long stretch in the medieval era when most European maps were drawn with the east on the top. If there was any doubt about this move’s religious significance, they eliminated it with their maps’ pious illustrations, whether of Adam and Eve or Christ enthroned. In the same period, Arab map makers often drew maps with the south facing up, possibly because this was how the Chinese did it.
Things changed with the age of exploration. Like the Renaissance, this era didn’t start in Northern Europe. It began in the Mediterranean, somewhere between Europe and the Arab world. In the 14th and 15th centuries, increasingly precise navigational maps of the Mediterranean Sea and its many ports called Portolan charts appeared. They were designed for use by mariners navigating the sea’s trade routes with the help of a recently adopted technology, the compass. These maps had no real up or down — pictures and words faced in all sorts of directions, generally pointing inward from the edge of the map — but they all included a compass rose with north clearly distinguished from the other directions.

Image: A perfectly good map. Select to embiggen.

futurejournalismproject:

Mapping Perspective

Via Al Jazeera:

Why do maps always show the north as up? For those who don’t just take it for granted, the common answer is that Europeans made the maps and they wanted to be on top. But there’s really no good reason for the north to claim top-notch cartographic real estate over any other bearing, as an examination of old maps from different places and periods can confirm…

…There is nothing inevitable or intrinsically correct — not in geographic, cartographic or even philosophical terms — about the north being represented as up, because up on a map is a human construction, not a natural one. Some of the very earliest Egyptian maps show the south as up, presumably equating the Nile’s northward flow with the force of gravity. And there was a long stretch in the medieval era when most European maps were drawn with the east on the top. If there was any doubt about this move’s religious significance, they eliminated it with their maps’ pious illustrations, whether of Adam and Eve or Christ enthroned. In the same period, Arab map makers often drew maps with the south facing up, possibly because this was how the Chinese did it.

Things changed with the age of exploration. Like the Renaissance, this era didn’t start in Northern Europe. It began in the Mediterranean, somewhere between Europe and the Arab world. In the 14th and 15th centuries, increasingly precise navigational maps of the Mediterranean Sea and its many ports called Portolan charts appeared. They were designed for use by mariners navigating the sea’s trade routes with the help of a recently adopted technology, the compass. These maps had no real up or down — pictures and words faced in all sorts of directions, generally pointing inward from the edge of the map — but they all included a compass rose with north clearly distinguished from the other directions.

Image: A perfectly good map. Select to embiggen.

1,389 notes

noreasontopretendwithme:

ejacutastic:

it’s time for school

How it actually feels

noreasontopretendwithme:

ejacutastic:

it’s time for school

How it actually feels

(Source: frenchdad)

252,070 notes

People don’t think space be like it is, but it do.

1 note

nbchannibal:

When Will finds a new dog…

4,592 notes